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Librarian Blog

New services?

The library is considering adding a couple of programs, and we'd like to have your input.
One new service would allow library patrons to stream videos -- movies and documentaries alike. This service would be free, but would require you to have a pretty fast Internet download speed.
Another new service might actually give you that faster download speed because we would loan out Internet hotspots. The loan period would be limited, but we haven't determined how long that would be. In fact, this particular service is still in the talking phase.
So, what do you think? Would you like to see movies and documentaries free via a library service? Could you use an Internet hotspot (I know this seems like the wrong venue to ask that question, but ...)?
Let me know by calling 512-847-2188.

See that button up there?

Maybe you've seen the red button on the top righthand side of our home page.
It says, simply, Donate.
We'd like to make clear that when you click on that button you have the opportunity to donate money for the expansion project of the library. That button is not for donations for the continuing operations of the library.
I've had some inquiries about that, so that's a clarification.
Now for some information for those who might want to make one-time gifts for our building fund: You can make checks payable to "Wimberley Village Library Foundation." That assures that your gift is tax exempt, and puts it in the right bucket here.
Thanks for any help you can muster!

Phone for all?

Tim Cook spent some time today defending the pricing of the new iPhone that goes on sale tomorrow.
Business Insider reported on his comments, among which were ones that pointed out that Apple does have some products that are actually below $400.
I'm not sure what those would be.
Certainly not the new iPhone. It is going to cost around $1,000.
That kind of takes my breath away.
I mean, I operate day in and day out with a smartphone that I bought from Wal-Mart for about $70, and it came with a month of free service. I don't even have a contract.
So, it is really hard for me to imagine what I would do with a $1,000 phone. Please tell me.
I know what I could do with the $1,000 I wouldn't spend on iPhone. I could buy two or three Dell laptops and a couple of desktops. I'd almost have enough money to buy an Apple laptop, but not quite.
Consumer electronic doo-dads are worth what people will pay, and for a reason I cannot fathom they will pay for Apples.

Spotting fake news

Right below this space you will find some links to places where you can check out news or stories you think might be fake or less than true.
We're among the few libraries that have taken the initiative to put this kind of information together. That's too bad.
But, it's also too bad that so few educational institutions seem to be making even this minimal amount of effort.
Time magazine reported on the fake news problem in last week's editions. Along with their lamentation about the phenomenon, they looked at some solutions.
They quote Peter Burger of Leiden University in The Netherlands as suggesting that at the most basic level, fundamental addtions have to be made to school curricula to teach kids how to spot fake news and how to deal with hoaxes.
Unfortunately, that is a longterm solution, if it is one at all.
For everyone else, you just have to keep your guard up.

A gathering place

When there is talk of a wall between Mexico and the United States, the idea that comes to mind is to separate two groups of people one from another.
What if a wall could do the opposite and bring people together?
How about a Library Wall, where Mexicans and U.S. residents would gather to trade and sell books and talk about ideas?
Far-fetched?
Not for Ronald Rael, a professor at the Universitiy of California at Berkeley and the author of a new book called "Borderwall As Architecture."
Business Insider previews the ideas in the book in its online journal filed today.
The library iin Rael's book is just one of many designed to make something of the wall besides, well, a mere wall.
He has, for example, plans for a Burrito Wall, where people would come to break bread together.
And there's a solar-energy gathering wall among his proposals.
The library wall actually has a prototype up on the Canadian-U.S. border, according to BI.
So, you know, if we build they might come. And that might not be such a bad thing after all.
DMC Firewall is developed by Dean Marshall Consultancy Ltd